Close
 
 (310)
   
Upcoming Auctions
   
Past Auctions
   
Site

Fine Chinese Works of Art

94

A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia, ...

Estimate: EUR 200.000,00 - 300.000,00

Currency Conversion
Currency Conversion
USD 225.700,00 - 338.550,00
GBP 179.670,00 - 269.505,00
Lot No.
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...
A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia,  ...

A large and rare gilt bronze figure of a standing Amitayus with aura on a lotus flower, Zanabazar, Mongolia, third quarter of 17th century

IT WILL NOT BE POSSIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS LOT BY THE WEB, WILL BE ACCEPTED ONLY TELEPHONE BIDS AND ROOM BIDS (WITH SPECIAL PADDLE).

FOR PARTICIPATION ON THIS PLEASE PLEASE CONTACT CAMBI AT LEAST 5 WORKING DAYS BEFORE SALES FOR REGISTRATION AND SECURITY DEPOSIT.



height 68.5 cm Provenance: Cerruti    the facial expression is relaxed and strong at once: the arched eyebrows meet at the tip of the nose to frame the eyes, that are elegantly curved in deep meditation. The body is proportioned according to the standards of Tibetan iconography, allowing a sense of naturalness to shine through. A part of his long black hair is gathered up into a high bun and a part flows down to his feet. He is wearing the thirteen ornaments of a princely Bodhisattva: the five-pointed crown, heavy earrings, several necklaces, armbands, bracelets, strands of pearls, belt and anklets. He stands upright on a pedestal of lotus flowers in full bloom and in his hands he holds a cup. ZANABAZARTibetan Buddhism, a religion of strong ritual character and with a crowded pantheon of gods and deities, was a source of inspiration for religious art in Mongolia. Mongolian art was strongly influenced by the styles of the neighboring regions of Tibet, India, Nepal and China. Cultural relations between Tibet and Mongolia were closely woven and long-standing: Tibetan Lamas would proselytize in Mongolia and Mongols would go on pilgrimages to Tibet. Tibetan sculptures and objects of worship were precious fruits of these travels and were a source of inspiration for local masters. Artists would follow the descriptions in the religious texts when designing the sacred image, faithfully observing its iconography and proportions. Mongolian sculpture art, while sharing the same iconography as Tibetan and Chinese art, stands out significantly due to precise technical and formal characteristics. The style of the ornament, the shape of the lotus petals and the way the base is inserted and sealed often reveals evidence on the country of origin. In the late 17th and early 18th century, the sculptor par excellence in the Buddhist countries was Zanabazar. Bogdo Gegen Zanabazar (Mongolia 1635-1723) was the son of the Tusheet Khan, one of the leaders of Mongolia in the 17th century, a direct descendant of Chinggis Khan, the founder of the Mongol Empire. Zanabazar was not only a great artist, but also an enlightened monk and one of the most relevant characters in his country’s political, religious and cultural history. During a trip to Tibet in 1640, he was recognized both by the Panchen Lama and by the Dalai Lama as a living Buddha and was considered to be the fist Mongolian incarnation of the Buddha Avalokitesvara. Esteemed scholar, astrologer, physician and poet, Zanabazar was often surrounded by an aura of legend, but he is best known for his unparalleled sculptures, which are among the top works of Buddhist art. In Zanabazar’s work, and especially in the sculptures, mostly made by the followers of his school, what stands out thanks to their singular beauty are the proportions and the facial expressions of the deities, portrayed in deep meditation, skillfully depicted according to the characteristics of the ideal body. In 1688 Zanabazar wrote the new alphabet Soyomb, whose symbol appears on the flag of Mongolia. Zanabazar’s greatest contribution to Mongolian art were his sculptures in gilt bronze. They portray young, beautifully proportioned figures. Their faces are characterized by a high forehead, thin arched eyebrows, high-bridged noses and small plump lips. The jewelry is sophisticated, especially the simple long strand of pearls laid across the bust. Zanabazar’s sculptures are generally composed of two parts, the body and the pedestal, created separately and then welded together. Most of the sculptures were then mercury-gilded. In keeping with the Tibetan tradition, faces were often painted in gold and lips and eyes were colored with mineral pigments. Pacific deities had blue-painted hair, while the ferocious guardians were painted with red hair. The lotus pedestals in Zanabazar's and his school’s sculptures are peculiar. Rather than the typical oval and rectangular Tibetan throne, they show a preference for circular or drum-shaped and semi-oval pedestals with tall bases. Zanabazar’s school also stands out for the many varieties of beautiful lotus petals and for the beaded decorations on the upper part of the pedestal, and sometimes on the bottom too. A special emphasis is placed on the stamens of lotus flowers: they were meticulously engraved either as vertical stripes below the row of beads or as small fan-shaped groups between the lotus petals.In the Tibetan tradition, even in Mongolia, sculptures were given a blessing upon completion. Sacred items like prayer rolls and other relics were placed inside the statue and the base was sealed with a metal plate. The standard decoration for this lower plate was a double-dorje engraving, although some were left without a decoration. Zanabazar’s double dorje was particularly well-refined and often gilded. In the intersection between the two dorjes, some remained without a decoration, while in others we can find three circular segments, symbolizing an endless change and a blissful mind radiating compassion.Ambassador Vittorio Cerruti Born in 1881 in Novara, he graduated in law from the University of Rome in July 1903. Entered through competition in the diplomatic career, at first he was Secretary of legation in Vienna. During World War I he moved to several countries up to September 1922, when he was appointed as Minister Plenipotentiary in Beijing. He got married in 1923 with Elizabeth de Paulay, who was Hungarian, and left China in 1926. In 1922 he had the opportunity to attend the last Chinese imperial wedding, when China had already become a Republican country, and he had the honor of being granted an audience with the Panchen Lama during his visit to Beijing in 1926. In 1927 he was appointed Ambassador, the youngest since the constitution of the Kingdom of Italy, and assigned to Moscow, then to Brazil in 1930 and finally in 1932 he was transferred to Berlin at the Italian Embassy in Germany. The appointment was due to Mussolini’s full recognition of his qualities as an expert of the German and Central European world. In the problematic context of national socialism, his diplomatic skills proved themselves valuable thanks to his lucid analysis, his insights in making forecasts and his ability to remain uninfluenced by the environment in which he operated. His last assignment was in Paris from 1935 to 1937. Laid off at age fifty-seven in June 1938, he went back to his father’s activity, becoming President of the Banca popolare di Novara and becoming a Board member of various companies. He died in Novara on April 25, 1961.
Provenienza: Cerruti    Il Buddismo tibetano, una religione di marcata impronta rituale e con un affolato pantheon di dei e divinità, fu fonte d’ispirazione dell’arte religiosa della Mongolia. L’arte mongola risente fortemente degli stili delle regioni confinanti di Tibet, India, Nepal e Cina. I rapporti culturali tra il Tibet e la Mongolia erano fitti e di lunga data: i Lama tibetani facevano proseliti in Mongolia e i mongoli andavano in pellegrinaggio in Tibet. Le sculture e gli oggetti di culto tibetani erano frutti preziosi di questi viaggi e costituivano motivo d’ispirazione dei maestri locali. Gli artisti si attenevano alle descrizioni dei testi religiosi nel realizzare l'immagine sacra ispirandosi fedelmente alla sua iconografia e alle sue proporzioni. L’arte scultorea mongola, pur condividendo la stessa iconografia tibetana e cinese, si distingue nettamente per precise caratteristiche tecniche e formali. Lo stile dell’ornamento, la forma dei petali di loto ed il modo in cui la base è inserita e sigillata spesso rivela indizi sul paese d’origine. Nel tardo Seicento e all’inizio del Settecento, lo scultore per eccellenza nei paesi Buddisti era Zanabazar. Bogdo Gegen Zanabazar (Mongolia 1635-1723) era figlio del Khan Tusheet, uno dei capi della Mongolia nel XVII secolo, diretto discendente di Gengis Khan, il fondatore dell’Impero mongolo. Zanabazar non fu solo un grande artista, ma anche un monaco illuminato e uno dei personaggi più rilevanti della storia politica, religiosa e culturale del suo paese. Nel corso di un viaggio in Tibet nel 1640, fu riconosciuto sia dal Panchen Lama che dal Dalai Lama come Buddha vivente e venne considerato la prima incarnazione mongola del Buddha Avalokitesvara. Stimato erudito, astrologo, medico e poeta, Zanabazar fu spesso avvolto da un’aura di leggenda, ma è conosciuto soprattutto per le sue incomparabili sculture, che risultano essere tra le massime opere dell'arte buddista. Nelle opere di Zanabazar e in particolare nelle sculture, eseguite per lo più dai seguaci della sua scuola, risaltano nella loto singolare bellezza le proporzioni e i volti delle divinità ritratte in profonda meditazione, abilmente riprodotte secondo le caratteristiche del corpo ideale. Nel 1686 Zanabazar scrisse il nuovo alfabeto Soyomb, il cui simbolo compare sulla bandiera mongola. Il maggiore contributo di Zanabazar all’arte mongola furono le sue sculture in bronzo dorato. Rappresentano figure giovani e meravigliosamente proporzionate. I loro volti sono caratterizzati da una fronte alta, da sottili sopracciglia ad arco, nasi dal ponte alto e piccole labbra carnose. I gioielli sono raffinati, specialmente il semplice lungo filo di perle che attraversa il busto. Le sculture di Zanabazar sono generalmente composte da due parti, il corpo e il piedistallo, creati separatamente e poi saldati insieme. La maggior parte delle sculture veniva poi dorata al mercurio. Seguendo la tradizione tibetana, i volti spesso venivano dipinti in oro a freddo e gli occhi e le labbra colorati con pigmenti minerali. Le divinità pacifiche avevano i capelli dipinti di blu, mentre i feroci guardiani venivano dipinti con i capelli rossi. I piedistalli di loto delle sculture di Zanabazar e della sua scuola sono peculiari. Invece del tipico trono ovale e rettangolare tibetano, mostrano una preferenza per piedistalli circolari o a tamburo e semi-ovali con alte basi. La scuola di Zanabazar si distingue anche per le molte varietà di bellissimi petali di loto e per la decorazione a perline sulla parte superiore del piedistallo, a volte anche su quella inferiore. Particolare enfasi viene data agli stami dei fiori di loto: erano meticolosamente incisi sia come striature verticali al di sotto della fila di perline sia come piccoli gruppi a forma di ventaglio tra i petali di loto. Secondo la tradizione tibetana, anche in Mongolia le sculture venivano benedette una volta completate. Oggetti sacri come rotoli di preghiere e altre reliquie venivano inseriti all’interno della statua e la base veniva sigillata con un piatto di metallo. La decorazione standard per questa lamina inferiore era un’incisione a doppio dorje, anche se alcune erano lasciate senza decoro. Il doppio dorje di Zanabazar era particolarmente bene rifinito e spesso dorato. Nell’intersezione tra i due dorje alcuni restavano senza decoro, in altri invece possiamo trovare tre segmenti circolari, a simboleggiare il cambiamento senza fine e una mente beata che irradia compassione. Ambasciatore Vittorio Cerruti Nato nel 1881 a Novara, conseguì la laurea in Giurisprudenza presso l’Università di Roma nel luglio del 1903. Entrato per concorso nella carriera diplomatica, fu inizialmente segretario di legazione a Vienna. Durante la Grande Guerra si trasferì in diversi Paesi fino al settembre del 1922, quando venne incaricato come Ministro Plenipotenziario a Pechino. Convolato a nozze nel 1923 con l’ungherese Elisabetta de Paulay, lasciò la Cina nel 1926. Nel 1922 ebbe l’opportunità di presenziare all’ultimo matrimonio imperiale cinese, quando la Cina era già un paese repubblicano, ed ebbe l’onore di un’udienza con il Panchen Lama durante la sua visita a Pechino nel 1926. Nel 1927 venne nominato Ambasciatore, il più giovane dalla costituzione del Regno d’Italia, e assegnato Mosca, poi in Brasile nel 1930 ed infine nel 1932 fu trasferito a Berlino presso l’ambasciata Italiana in Germania. La nomina era dovuta al pieno riconoscimento da parte di Mussolini delle sue qualità di esperto conoscitore del mondo tedesco e centroeuropeo. Nel contesto problematico del nazional-socialismo, risultarono preziose le sue capacità di diplomatico lucido nelle analisi, perspicace nelle previsioni e poco influenzabile dall’ambiente nel quale operava. L’ultimo incarico fu a Parigi dal 1935 al 1937. Congedato a cinquantasette anni nel giugno del 1938, riprese poi l’attività paterna assumendo la presidenza della Banca popolare di Novara e divenendo consigliere d’amministrazione di varie società. Morì a Novara il 25 aprile del 1961.
Departments
Oriental Art
Estimate

EUR 200.000,00 - 300.000,00

 
Currency Conversion
USD 225.700,00 - 338.550,00
GBP 179.670,00 - 269.505,00
sold
EUR 3.900.000,00

Online community

Contact us by Skype